An Investment in Knowledge Pays the Best Interest…

“An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.”

Benjamin Franklin said this, not me. And it’s a great quote. Remember that Franklin needed money for printing presses, so he went back to England and set up his “Payday Loan” company and raked in the interest at 500% a week!  His buddies working at the printing press wanted to drink beer on Friday night and needed money.  So Ben loaned them enough to go out that night, if when paid they paid him back with interest. Read Benjamin Franklin’s Experiment with Compound Interest for more fascinating details about his venture. Within a couple of years he was able to purchase all the presses he needed to set up business in Philadelphia.  By the time he was 53, he retired from active labor.  Benjamin Franklin lived until he was 83 years old and died wealthy.

Of course we all know he signed the Declaration of Independence and was totally involved in crafting the U.S. Constitution.  His picture is printed on all our $100 bills.  But beyond all of that very important stuff, he was also a very disciplined and driven man who learned from a young age how to apply his knowledge to help build a fantastic future from which sprang much more than just a return on investment for him, but a legacy that has affected all of us as well.

Take Benjamin Franklin at his word and go to www.moneymastery.com and see for yourself how investing in your own financial education can bring you a wonderful return on investment.  Here’s what you will learn that you can apply to your life immediately that will bring you short-term and long-term rewards:

  • How to get in control of your spending immediately, which will make it possible for you to find at least $100 you are wasting every month.
  • How to get out of ALL debt, including a mortgage, in 10 years or less. 
  • How to begin saving 1% of your income and work up to 10% of your income for the rest of your life.  And similarly, this knowledge will show you how to add at least $300,000 to your current retirement nest egg.